The Godfather: Part II (1974)
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The Godfather: Part II (1974)


Genre
:
Drama | Crime
Rating
:
8.589 / 10
Release Date
:
20 December 1974
Resolution
:
1920x1080
Duration
:
3 : 22 minutes
Spoken Language
:
English, Italiano, Latin, Español
Status
:
Released
Overview
:
In the continuing saga of the Corleone crime family, a young Vito Corleone grows up in Sicily and in 1910s New York. In the 1950s, Michael Corleone attempts to expand the family business into Las Vegas, Hollywood and Cuba.

Cast Overview :

Don Michael Corleone
by: Al Pacino
Tom Hagen
by: Robert Duvall
Kay Corleone
by: Diane Keaton
Don Vito Corleone
by: Robert De Niro
Frederico 'Fredo' Corleone
by: John Cazale
Constanzia 'Connie' Corleone
by: Talia Shire
Hyman Roth
by: Lee Strasberg
Frank Pentangeli
by: Michael V. Gazzo
Senator Pat Geary
by: G. D. Spradlin
Al Neri
by: Richard Bright
Don Fanucci
by: Gastone Moschin
Rocco Lampone
by: Tom Rosqui
Young Clemenza
by: Bruno Kirby
Genco Abbandando
by: Frank Sivero
Young Carmela
by: Francesca De Sapio
Carmela 'Mama' Corleone
by: Morgana King
Deanna Corleone
by: Marianna Hill
Signor Roberto
by: Leopoldo Trieste
Johnny Ola
by: Dominic Chianese
Michael's Bodyguard
by: Amerigo Tot
Merle Johnson
by: Troy Donahue
Young Tessio
by: John Aprea
William 'Willie' Cicci
by: Joe Spinell
Salvatore 'Sal' Tessio
by: Abe Vigoda
Theresa Hagen
by: Tere Livrano
Carlo Rizzi
by: Gianni Russo
Mrs. Andolini
by: Maria Carta
Young Vito
by: Oreste Baldini
Don Francesco Ciccio
by: Giuseppe Sillato
Don Tommasino
by: Mario Cotone
Anthony Corleone
by: James Gounaris
Mrs. Marcia Roth
by: Fay Spain
F.B.I. Man #1
by: Harry Dean Stanton
F.B.I. Man #2
by: David Baker
Carmine Rosato
by: Carmine Caridi
Tony Rosato
by: Danny Aiello
Policeman
by: Carmine Foresta
Bartender
by: Nick Discenza
Father Carmelo
by: Joseph Medaglia
Michael's Buttonman #1
by: Joseph Della Sorte
Michael's Buttonman #2
by: Carmen Argenziano
Michael's Buttonman #3
by: Joe Lo Grippo
Impressario
by: Ezio Flagello
Tenor in 'Senza Mamma'
by: Livio Giorgi
Girl in 'Senza Mamma'
by: Kathleen Beller
Signora Colombo
by: Saveria Mazzola
Cuban President
by: Tito Alba
Cuban Translator
by: Johnny Naranjo
Pentangeli's Wife
by: Elda Maida
Pentangeli's Brother
by: Salvatore Po
Mosca
by: Ignazio Pappalardo
Strollo
by: Andrea Maugeri
Signor Abbandando
by: Peter LaCorte
Street Vendor
by: Vincent Coppola
Questadt
by: Peter Donat
Fred Corngold
by: Tom Dahlgren
Senator Ream
by: Paul B. Brown
Senator #1
by: Phil Feldman
Senator #2
by: Roger Corman
Yolanda
by: Ivonne Coll
Attendant at Brothel
by: Joe De Nicola
Ellis Island Doctor
by: Edward Van Sickle
Ellis Island Nurse
by: Gabriella Belloni
Customs Official
by: Richard Watson
Cuban Nurse
by: Venancia Grangerard
Governess
by: Erica Yohn
Midwife
by: Teresa Tirelli
Sonny Corleone
by: James Caan
Sonny Corleone as a Boy
by: Roman Coppola
Child on Ship
by: Sofia Coppola
Passerby in Coat with Cap Pulled Down (uncredited)
by: Sho Kosugi
Photographer in Court (uncredited)
by: Gary Kurtz
(uncredited)
by: Connie Mason
Extra (uncredited)
by: Frank Pesce
Cuban Guerilla with Grenade (uncredited)
by: Victor Pujols Faneyte
Sandrinella 'Sandra' Corleone (uncredited)
by: Julie Gregg
Vito's Uncle (uncredited)
by: Larry Guardino
Senator with mustache (uncredited)
by: Buck Houghton
Senator #3 (uncredited)
by: Richard Matheson
Young Hyman Roth (uncredited)
by: John Megna
Street Vendor (uncredited)
by: Jay Rasumny
Extra in Little Italy (uncredited)
by: Filomena Spagnuolo
Sam Roth (uncredited)
by: Julian Voloshin
Mama Corleone's Body (uncredited)
by: Italia Coppola

Member Reviews :

This is by far the greatest movie of all time! Even better than the first Godfather!
  jkbbr549
Worthy sequel to the first movie. In something more meditative and unhurried, in something more philosophically meaningful than its legendary predecessor. Backstage games and backstage talks replaced the dramatic mood swings of the main characters and the exchange of fire. The second film continues the story of Michael Carleone in the role of the Godfather, and also complements the family story with scenes of the formation of the young Vito Andolini and his escape to America. The difficult choice of being young Don, his sphere of expansion of influence opens up new heights and horizons, but also acquires new enemies. Big money and power always keep pace with great temptation, and therefore you should always keep your ears open. After all, the knife in the back can insert exactly the one from whom you do not expect ...
  Matthew Dixon
Building on the first volume, this self-adaptation by writer Mario Puzo and director Francis Ford Coppola develops the story of the new Don - "Michael" (Al Pacino). His attempts to expand, and to a certain extent legitimise, the family businesses see him associating with the duplicitous "Hyman Roth" (Lee Strasberg) in Cuba; subject to betrayal, assassination attempts and fighting what may be a losing battle to keep his own family together - all whilst doing plenty of Machiavellian manipulation of his own. There is an equally strong parallel thread depicting how his father "Vito" (Robert de Niro) rose to prominence after fleeing Sicily after the murder of his family at the hands of "Don Ciccio". With the principal characters all now well established, we can hit the ground running with a solid and complex set of inter-connected, character-driven storylines. The superior cast deliver this story really effectively - Robert Duvall and Diane Keaton as the consigliere and wife respectively, standing out. The attention to detail alongside the instantly recognisable Nino Rota score add amply to what is just a great story of Michael's efforts to build upon (and honour) his father's legacy, before he loses all of his own, once prevailing, decency. It is long, and it does miss Brando, but Pacino is on super form as the increasingly ruthless and isolated - even lonely - figure and I reckon this is every bit as good at the "Godfather" (1972).
  CinemaSerf